what legal way can i get someone to go to rehab without them signing a consent?

Bianka asks: what legal way can i get someone to go to rehab without them signing a consent?
I want to get my mom into some kind of rehab for her drug use. I live in CC Tx. I need somewhere that they can come and get her because she doesn’t think anything is wrong (of course). I am tired of it and don’t want to continue seeing her like this. I am 17 so i still can’t move out but i want her to get help so that when i leave for my university i can know my little sister will be safe.

Best answer:

Answer by rkbtoo
you legally cant force someone to go to rehab without their consent

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4 thoughts on “what legal way can i get someone to go to rehab without them signing a consent?

  1. Sir Studley Smugly

    It’s legally impossible to force someone into substance abuse rehab. It won’t do any good anyway; an addict has to admit they have a problem, and WANT to stop drinking/using. Your mother hasn’t done either.

    You could go to childhood Protection Services if you think your sister is in some sort of danger, but other than that, there’s nothing you can do.

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  2. M-Rod

    Speak to your mum and tell her the next time she is under the influence of and/or taking drugs you will call the Police. That may be enough for her to stop or consider going to rehab of her own accord.

    If that doesn’t work: Call the Police when she is using drugs, and when they arrive tell them you want her to go into rehab. That way the Police will take her to court for the drug use and the court can order a rehab course.

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  3. judgemaker

    In Florida we have both the Baker and Marchman Acts both of which allow for Involuntary admission to a treatment facility.

    An involuntary commitment is when there is good faith reason to believe the person is substance abuse impaired and, because of said impairment, has lost the power of self control over their substance use; either has inflicted, attempted or threatened to inflict or is likely to inflict physical harm on himself/herself or another; or the persons judgment has been so impaired because of substance abuse that he/she is incapable of appreciating the need for substance abuse treatment.

    I do not believe that Texas has a statute similar to Florifa’s. However, a Supreme Court case “Addington v. Texas” (see the link below) pretty much set the basis for involuntary commitment nationwide.

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